chapsnats:

if u are about to get stabbed just say “I have too much swagger for the dagger” and they will leave u alone


c’eeest si bon

de partir n’importe où

bras dessus, bras dessous

en chantant des chansons

c’est si bon

de se dire des mots doux

des petits rien du tout

mais qui en disent looooooooong (✿◠‿◠)


meet-me-in-europe:

Schwende, Switzerland

meet-me-in-europe:

Schwende, Switzerland


Drinking with my grandma is fun

posted il y a 1 jour with 1 note



billy-pilgrims:

[writes paper] this doesnt make any sense [prints it] [doesn’t proofread] [hands it in for a grade]


"

My response to the ‘I am not a feminist’ internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, ‘I’m not the feminist babysitter.’

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (it is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutesy sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.

"

Libby Anne (via newwavenova)

so. real.

(via runtheriot)


essence of beauty: lisa bonet



"J’ai partagé le monde en deux :
d’un côté il y a ce qui est poétique,
de l’autre côté ce qui ne l’est pas.
Ce qui est poétique existe à mes yeux,
ce qui n’est pas poétique,
je ne le regarde même pas."
— Alexandre Romanès (via eclats-de-vers)

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)
Most of Harry Wilson Watrous’ paintings feature elegantly dressed women engaging in banal activities against pastel, abstracted backgrounds. He presages Edward Hopper’s simplified forms and urban modernity, but with none of the isolating tension.
The titles, though, generally invite considerably more interesting—and sometimes even surreal—interpretations.
These perception-shifts range from the mild—a woman in elegant and slightly iridescent black sits rather uninspiringly in a cafe until her poetry-inpired title, A Cup of Tea, a Cigarette, and She, implies a third party—to the bizarre—a woman holding a tiny figurine of an 18th-century gentleman doffing his hat is somewhat unnervingly entitled The Suitors.

Sometimes Watrous’ choice casts intriguing doubt on an already-provocative piece: this family, an interracial couple and their daughter, caused enough of a stir at the National Academy of Design by the subject alone.
The title, though—The Drop Sinister—immediately raises a few more questions. Around 1913, when this was painted, a Constitutional Amendment was being proposed to ban interracial marriage on a principle called the “one-drop rule”: any African American ancestor at all, and a person would be considered black for the purposes of marriage. So perhaps that’s the answer—they worry for the marriageability of their daughter (and perhaps for the future legality of their own marriage). Certainly it’s an answer that would have occurred to Watrous’ audience.
The phrasing is a little odd, though. In casual speech, “a sinister drop” would sound more natural than. And it does seem slightly strange that two people with fairly dark hair have produced such a strikingly blond child. Not to mention that the nervous tension in the woman’s arm—and gaze—seems more focused on her husband than on her child. (But then, the bar sinister is a heraldic symbol indicating illegitimate birth.)
Now, I don’t have nearly so involved a tale to tell you about the 1915 painting this post ostensibly centers on. But I can tell you its suspiciously unassuming title: Just a Couple of Girls.

Look up what W.E.B Du Bois said about The Drop Sinister! It’s very interesting. 

femme-de-lettres:

Large (Wikimedia)

Most of Harry Wilson Watrous’ paintings feature elegantly dressed women engaging in banal activities against pastel, abstracted backgrounds. He presages Edward Hopper’s simplified forms and urban modernity, but with none of the isolating tension.

The titles, though, generally invite considerably more interesting—and sometimes even surreal—interpretations.

These perception-shifts range from the mild—a woman in elegant and slightly iridescent black sits rather uninspiringly in a cafe until her poetry-inpired title, A Cup of Tea, a Cigarette, and She, implies a third party—to the bizarre—a woman holding a tiny figurine of an 18th-century gentleman doffing his hat is somewhat unnervingly entitled The Suitors.

The Drop Sinister

Sometimes Watrous’ choice casts intriguing doubt on an already-provocative piece: this family, an interracial couple and their daughter, caused enough of a stir at the National Academy of Design by the subject alone.

The title, though—The Drop Sinister—immediately raises a few more questions. Around 1913, when this was painted, a Constitutional Amendment was being proposed to ban interracial marriage on a principle called the “one-drop rule”: any African American ancestor at all, and a person would be considered black for the purposes of marriage. So perhaps that’s the answer—they worry for the marriageability of their daughter (and perhaps for the future legality of their own marriage). Certainly it’s an answer that would have occurred to Watrous’ audience.

The phrasing is a little odd, though. In casual speech, “a sinister drop” would sound more natural than. And it does seem slightly strange that two people with fairly dark hair have produced such a strikingly blond child. Not to mention that the nervous tension in the woman’s arm—and gaze—seems more focused on her husband than on her child. (But then, the bar sinister is a heraldic symbol indicating illegitimate birth.)

Now, I don’t have nearly so involved a tale to tell you about the 1915 painting this post ostensibly centers on. But I can tell you its suspiciously unassuming title: Just a Couple of Girls.

Look up what W.E.B Du Bois said about The Drop Sinister! It’s very interesting. 


alinnetinagildedcage:

Portrait of Cristina di Belgiojoso Trivulzio
Francesco Paolo Hayez (1791-1882)

alinnetinagildedcage:

Portrait of Cristina di Belgiojoso Trivulzio

Francesco Paolo Hayez (1791-1882)



Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas

Abandoned Victorian Style Greenhouse, Villa Maria, in northern Italy near Lake Como. Photo taken in 1985 by Friedhelm Thomas


expertissim:

Ludovic BARON (1986)"L’homme de l’ombre" (Man from Shadow)Digital print on plexiglass, signed Ludovic Baron lower rightHeight: 44 cm (17-1/3 in.) - Width: 29 cm (11-1/3 in.)Frame: 52 x 37 cm (20-2/5 x 14-1/2 in.)Ludovic Baron is a young artist passionate about photography and creating images. He accepts the paradoxes at the heart of his work: realism and powerful dreams, borrowing cinematography and modern myths where superheroes and real people reside. When creating an image, Ludovic engages in a complex manufacturing process and always with spontaneity uses. Without putting aside his artistic projects, Ludovic parallels his talent and energy for many audiovisual projects included the beloved theater.Ludovic Baron never ceases to amaze us and grow. In November 2013, he exhibited at the Petit Palais in Paris along with great and renowned artists. He also chose to share and participate in an auction held in the prestigious Georges V hotel to benefit UNICEF. In 2014, Ludovic is preparing for new exhibits and developing new and more ambitious projects in France and abroad.

expertissim:

Ludovic BARON (1986)

"L’homme de l’ombre" (Man from Shadow)

Digital print on plexiglass, signed Ludovic Baron lower right

Height: 44 cm (17-1/3 in.) - Width: 29 cm (11-1/3 in.)
Frame: 52 x 37 cm (20-2/5 x 14-1/2 in.)

Ludovic Baron is a young artist passionate about photography and creating images. He accepts the paradoxes at the heart of his work: realism and powerful dreams, borrowing cinematography and modern myths where superheroes and real people reside. When creating an image, Ludovic engages in a complex manufacturing process and always with spontaneity uses. 

Without putting aside his artistic projects, Ludovic parallels his talent and energy for many audiovisual projects included the beloved theater.

Ludovic Baron never ceases to amaze us and grow. 

In November 2013, he exhibited at the Petit Palais in Paris along with great and renowned artists. He also chose to share and participate in an auction held in the prestigious Georges V hotel to benefit UNICEF. In 2014, Ludovic is preparing for new exhibits and developing new and more ambitious projects in France and abroad.